My top tips for coping with disability

Hello everyone and welcome back to My Blurred World.

I hope you’re all doing really well.

Today’s post is another disability related post and it’s all about my top tips for coping with disability. This can relate to disability in general but as I’m visually impaired I’m specifically focusing on sight loss.

These are ways that I personally find are helpful when trying to cope with my visual impairment so I thought I would share them with you all, I am in no way saying that these tips/methods can help everyone but I thought it would be a good idea to share them with you nonetheless.

I hope you enjoy today’s post and let’s begin.

1. Talk to others in the same situation

I’ve learnt that this helps a lot, talking to others who are in a similar situation to yourself is always a good way of feeling less isolated and alone. It reminds me that I’m not the only one living with sight loss and that there are so many other people who might be feeling the same way as myself and who are facing a similar battle. We always here it but it really does help to talk, it’s nice to speak to people who can relate to situations I’ve found myself in and I can talk to them about things that are happening in my life due to my sight loss and they don’t judge me for it, they understand and that is such a special thing.

2. Look on the positive side

Living with a disability isn’t all bad, there are so many positives but these positives might not be as clear as the negatives in some situations. I wrote a post a few months back about the best things about being visually impaired, you can read it here if you’re interested. I wrote that post because I honestly believe that there is a good side to being visually impaired, ok it’s not always a walk in the park but it’s also not the worst thing in the world. Focusing on the positives might help you to accept and cope with your disability, there might be just one thing that you consider as a positive but that one thing is better than nothing, just keep reminding yourself of that one positive, it might make a big difference to how you see your disability.

3. Embrace it

I’ve also written a post about Embracing your disability this can tie in to the last point of looking on the positive side. Living with sight loss/disability isn’t all bad and I think many of us just need to learn to embrace it. Admittedly, it’s not easy, I know that from personal experience but I’ve learnt to embrace my disability and I don’t let it define me. In my opinion, embracing my visual impairment is a good way of coping with it because it’s a reminder that my disability isn’t who I am and I can learn to embrace it rather than living in its shadows. Give it a try, you might be surprised at how embracing your disability will allow you to cope with it.

4. Don’t listen to other’s opinions/perceptions

We’ve all let people’s opinions and perceptions get to us right? Well I’m telling you now that it won’t do you any good. I’ve let people’s comments about my disability get me down in the past and it’s made it harder for me to cope with my disability as I feel like some people don’t accept me within society, it’s not nice to be treated differently and to hear people discriminating against you purely because of the fact that you live with a disability. I think it’s important to learn to ignore people’s harsh comments because what good will it do at the end of the day? People within society don’t know what it’s like to live with a disability so why do they feel the need to make comments about it? We disabled people aren’t different to anyone else in this world and I think it’s very important that we all remember that. There is such a huge stigma surrounding sight loss and this perception that some have which makes it harder to cope with disability as it can make us feel like we’re not accepted within society but if we learn to ignore those perceptions it might make things better. It’s easier said than done, I know that but it’s something we can learn to do and if disability is a subject that is heard of more often, people’s perceptions might change and the misconceptions might slowly disappear. Never let anyone’s opinions get you down, live your life the way you want to.

5. Don’t let your disability define you

Your disability isn’t who you are, remind yourself of that as often as you feel is necessary. People don’t love you or hate you because of your disability. Never let your disability define you, as I said just embrace it, look on the positive side. Never let your disability stop you from being the person you want to be. It’s true, your disability is part of who you are but it’s not you, it’s not something that should stand in your way. Finding ways to cope with it will allow you to be the person you want to be, it’s going to be harder to be that person if you let your disability define you. I know it’s not easy but nothing is impossible. Not letting your disability define who you are is a huge step towards accepting and coping with it, your disability isn’t who you are.

That concludes my post for today everyone, I hope you all enjoyed it and found it useful. Let me know what you thought of it in the comments below and also do let me know if you’re living with sight loss or any other disability and what are your top tips for coping with it, I would love to hear from you.

Thank you all so much for reading today’s post. Until next time.

Elin x

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6 thoughts on “My top tips for coping with disability

  1. Hi Elin  I really enjoyed reading this blog post, well written and can relate to it in many ways. I’m 24, live with sight loss myself and know that it is challenging but there are positives too.  Hope you’re well Niamh

    Liked by 1 person

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